Sell plasma. After passing an initial screening, you can usually sell your plasma for anywhere from $25 to $50 per donation. To qualify, you’ll have to stand in a long line or show up early, be willing to fill out a very personal questionnaire, and endure a painful needle prick or two. Still, selling plasma is a great way to raise money fast – if you can stand the hassle.
Thanks to the internet, there are plenty of ways we can make extra money from home. In fact, making money online from the comfort of your home, no matter where you live, is far easier than most assume. You do have to navigate the so-called guru gauntlet. Sure. That is if you're looking to scoop up an offer from today's vast pallette of never-ending webinars, trial programs, and sales funnels that seem to pop up everywhere we turn.
If your career path is going nowhere, resign gracefully and switch careers. Research occupations to find out how much they pay and what their future outlook is (in the U.S., you can find this information in the Bureau of Labor Statistics Occupational Outlook Handbook). Find an occupation that pays well, and invest in the education and/or training to get you that job. Look for employers that offer competitive salaries and ample opportunity for advancement.
It’s sometimes hard to comprehend just how much people love t-shirts. And with the right niche, marketing, and tools, you can create an online t-shirt business that makes you extra money online while you sleep. (Even Bloomberg and Forbes feature stories from entrepreneurs who've done just that.) Services like TeeSpring make it easier than ever to create a t-shirt drop-shipping business where they handle the sales, printing, and shipping, and you’re only responsible for design and marketing. For more tips, check out this simple guide to launching and marketing an online clothing store by my friends over at Selz.
ChaCha (chacha.com), the service that responds to random questions from phone calls or texts, hires guides to text back answers from home. To apply, take a quick test on the website to determine your "guide role." We got info about becoming a guide via text, of course: "I was lucky enough to make Top Guide and now make 20 a text. Thanks for asking!" As a generalist or specialist, you can expect payments between 10 and 20 per completed task.
4. Immense choices - As mentioned before, there would be immense open doors at your doorstep. You can do whatever you need. You don't have to be an Ace in a particular field however you can be a Specialist in a specific field which you jump at the chance to do the most. In case you're great in keeping in touch with, you could make a digital book and offer it on the web, or begin a blog on a particular specialty or in the event that you are great in coding, you can outline site layouts and offer it online simply like consultants do.
Freelancing is the next best thing to being paid more for your full-time work, because professional work always pays more than unskilled. To find opportunities, let former colleagues or other personal connections that you’re available for freelance gigs. (Here are some ideas on how LinkedIn could be useful for that.) Or, post on marketplaces particular to your field. For instance, Mediabistro, a journalism site, allows freelancers to post profiles of their experience and services. Though these are more up to chance, designers can bid on jobs at 99Designs.com or submit a design at Threadless, to see if it will be crowdfunded. Elance-Odesk also lists many freelance opportunities, and you can also post your own services on Fiverr, although some freelancers say these services create a race to the bottom on fees and so are not very lucrative. If you're new to freelancing, here's how to set your rates, and here's how to negotiate raises with clients.
The MTA's Music Under New York program (341 Madison Ave at 45th St; 212-878-4678, mta.info/mta/aft/muny/) schedules musicians to play each month in city subway stations. Too underground (har) for auditions? You can still legally perform your acoustic rendition of "Circus" in the subway. As long as you're not using an amplification device, selling CDs or positioned near a booth, in a car, or blocking the flow of traffic, you're totally within your rights. Check in with City Lore's Street Performers Advocacy Project (212-529-1955, citylore.org) to learn the rules.
I recently stumbled on the Trim app and I have to say, this one is a game changer. It’s a simple app that acts as your own personal financial manager. Once you link your bank to the app, Trim analyzes your spending, finds subscriptions you need to cancel, negotiates your Comcast bill, finds you better car insurance, and more. And of course, the app is free! My bet is that it will only take a few days for Trim to put an extra $100 in your pocket. So easy!
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