At CafePress (cafepress.com), you can create shirts, posters and bumper stickers and sell them to the site's 6.5 million users. Each item has a base price; you decide the markup. When someone buys a product, CafePress prints it and ships it, and you get a check for your total markups once a month. Tamara Remedios, whose day job is running Restaurant Week in Hoboken and Jersey City, started a popular customized T-shirt store on CafePress called Wear My Name in 2001, on which she spends about 10--15 hours a month. Her average markup is $6, and her busiest months net about 100 sales. "I put everything I make in a bank account and go on a vacation each year," she says.
Even in the age of automation, some jobs still require a human touch. Companies often outsource those jobs via services like Amazon’s Mechanical Turk. These jobs can be tedious — tagging images, transcribing videos, classifying receipts — and can take anywhere from a few minutes to a few hours. Pay depends on the task, and the person requesting the work gets to approve the finished product before paying you. That can leave room for scams, so do your research and join a community like TurkNation, which can steer you away from shifty dealers. Read more about doing tasks on Mechanical Turk.
"Fewer people want to spend a lot shopping," says pro stylist Angela Hastings (angelahastings.com). "They want to make the most of what they have." Hastings, who creates looks for magazines like Elle, Harper's Bazaar, Entertainment Weekly and comapnies like Banana Republic, started earning good money on the side seven years ago when she helped a friend of a friend with her look. "Personal styling is more about reality, and editorial styling is about fantasy," she says. "I like doing both." Hastings starts by giving clients a questionnaire to figure out exactly what they want, then she digs through their closets with them to figure out what does and doesn't work. She won't divulge her pricing, but others advertising on Craigslist charge $150 per hour to more than $1,000 a day.

Next, you need to set up and build your YouTube channel. Your YouTube channel is your homebase for all your content. If you already have a Google account for Gmail or Google Drive, then you can use that to log-in to YouTube and start setting up your channel. Pick a username that works for you and is memorable (if you’re using an existing Google account you’ll have to edit your username in Google+).
Small crowdsourcing, online, and real-world tasks, sometimes called  micro jobs, have become an increasingly popular way to pick up extra cash. Short-task websites offer a way for buyers and sellers of services to connect. These gigs generally don't take much effort and, as a result, don't usually pay much. However, if your goal is to earn a few extra dollars, then micro jobs may be just what you need.

If you’ve got some free time and don’t live in the middle of nowhere, becoming a Lyft driver can be a very lucrative side hustle that allows you make money fast. And right now, they’ve got a promotion going on where any new driver will instantly get a $300 bonus after completing their 100th ride. If you start now and hustle hard on the weekends, you can probably unlock that bonus within a few weeks of driving (and that’s in addition to your normal earnings).

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