Many companies, such as J. Crew, Express Jet, 1-800-flowers, and even the IRS, outsource customer-service operations to third-party companies who then hire home-based workers or "agents" to take calls and orders. When you call 1-800-flowers, you may be speaking with Rebecca Dooley, a retired police officer and employee of Alpine Access, a major call-center service. When you dialed the number, your call was automatically routed to Rebecca's spare bedroom in Colorado.
Believe it or not, there's an actual business, Profile Helper (profilehelper.com), that interviews clueless daters and charges them $50--$100 to revamp their dating profiles. Clever up your Facebook page to advertise your profile prowess; post info about your service on OKCupid (okcupid.com) and Craigslist. Charge $30 a pop and tell your successful clients to pass the word along. For more money, offer to snap flattering photos.
If you've watched Saturday morning cartoons like G.I. Joe, Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles and Pokmon, you've no doubt heard Tom Wayland. The 37-year-old is a director-at-large for DuArt Film & Video and also freelances as a voice actor himself. "Compared to other acting gigs, like theater, voiceover work is the best bang for your buck," he says. "If you book a national union spot with residuals, you can make thousands and thousands of dollars over time." Wayland recommends signing with an agency like CESD Talent Agency (257 Park Ave South between 20th and 21st Sts; 212-477-1666, cesdtalent.com), which vets hopefuls by listening to their vocal demos. "[A demo] is your calling card in the voice world," says CESD agent Tom Celia. But he doesn't think you need to spend a fortune to have it professionally produced—editing together clips on your home computer will work just fine. And if you'd rather try to find work without an agent, create a profile for Voice123.com, which maintains a database of casting listings.
Selling clothes you no longer wear is a quick way to make some money. Start with local consignment shops for faster cash, or use sites like ThredUp and Poshmark to find buyers. If you go the online route, be sure to take clear, well-lit photos of your pieces and research similar items to set competitive prices. Get tips on how to sell your clothing.

The second step is to get your web hosting.  There are a lot of hosting companies out there, and Bluehost seems to be one of the best. Hosting starts at around $2.95 a month. It’ll most likely cost you around $60 a year, which is really good deal! If you pay for more than one year at a time, you also get a free domain through Bluehost if you buy through my link.
Sell your stuff. You can also make a little extra money by selling your old things. There may be a lot of items sitting around in your house that you hardly ever think about, but which can earn you some serious cash. You shouldn't have to part with anything you love or need for sentimental reasons, but if you can get rid of some things you don't really care about, you can earn some extra cash while also doing some inadvertent clean-up around the house. Here are a few things to sell:
Manage social media for businesses. If you have a knack for social media, you could potentially get paid to manage various platforms for others. Many businesses are too busy running day-to-day operations to stay on top of their Facebook, Twitter, and Pinterest accounts – and will pay someone with the knowledge and time to do it for them. To find these jobs, ask local businesses and check sites like UpWork.com and Problogger.net.
I recently stumbled on the Trim app and I have to say, this one is a game changer. It’s a simple app that acts as your own personal financial manager. Once you link your bank to the app, Trim analyzes your spending, finds subscriptions you need to cancel, negotiates your Comcast bill, finds you better car insurance, and more. And of course, the app is free! My bet is that it will only take a few days for Trim to put an extra $100 in your pocket. So easy!
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