You could try advertising more, for example, by putting up signs around the neighborhood, posting about it on social media, or having people you know spread the word. You could also try doing it in a different neighborhood that might have friendlier people, or do it in a time and place where there's likely to be a lot of people walking around the area (e.g., near a church before the end of a mass).
Etsy: While Etsy's popularity has declined recently, it's still a great resource for selling handmade items online. No need for complex ecommerce sites or merchant accounts or any sort of automation. The company takes a commission of every sale and charges a small listing fee per item. But many still use Etsy as their primary source of income. The best part is that you can also sell digital products on here such as poster designs. 
Over one summer, I was asked to be a staff writer for a blog. The e-mail came out of nowhere, but after I received it, I started looking into staff writing further. Having a blog (as talked about before), helped people find me and consider me for their staff writing positions. After that initial e-mail, I then posted on Yakezie (a personal finance community with a great forum) and stated that I was searching for a staff writing position. After I made the post on the forum, I received a couple of e-mails and this is what launched my staff writing career. The power of throwing yourself out there and just asking was definitely helpful for me.
Any hobby that could potentially make money can be considered a business for tax purposes. File a Schedule C and you can deduct expenses considered "ordinary or necessary," says CPA Neil Schloss of Castle Consulting. If your business is a band, that includes the cost of equipment, practice space, transportation to gigs, even concert tickets and CDs. You're allowed two years of loss with your business, so even if you don't sell any discs, you can still save on taxes.
 @dasjung It sounds like you paid a lot for your education, as did I. But you got to face it, today’s technology allows the average Joe to accomplish a comparable logo with much less effort than you or I could put into it, and the savings outweighs the extra benefit of our knowledge. We, as designers, have been out done. It is time to go back to school, unfortunately… 
Find items that you know are selling below their full value (either online or through a deal website like SlickDeals.net), discount stores (Marshalls, Ross, etc.) buy them and sell them for more on eBay or Amazon. Once you find your product niche you can set up a system. Don't read over that too quickly. You need to find a particular product or niche to really make this work. Otherwise, you're met with different shipping costs, always trying to figure out new margins, etc. Don't try to be everything to everybody. Try to be good in one particular. Maybe it's a product you're passionate about such as selling trucker hats.  🙂 Click here for more on this idea.
Know the difference between an asset and a liability. The dividing line is whether it puts money in your pocket, or takes it out.[4] As much as you love your home, for instance, it is a liability rather than an asset because you put more money into it than you get out of it (unless you're flipping it or renting it out). Whatever money you save, invest it in assets such as stocks, mutual funds, patents, copyrighted works--anything that generates interest or royalties. Eventually, you might get to the point where your assets are doing the work for you, and all you have to do is sit there and make money!

CashCrate sends out literally thousands of payments a month to users just like you who spend time completing surveys and offers on CashCrate.com. How do they do it? Well, they do surveys and offers regularly. It really adds up! Your initial goal should be to meet minimum payout, which is $20.00. Making $20.00 in free cash is actually quite easy considering there are hundreds of surveys and offers available, but here are a few tips to get you to your goal faster:
6. Rent out your room on Airbnb. Airbnb.com is an online marketplace where people buy and sell the space they own. Some people rent out their vacation homes, some rent out their floor and an air mattress, and some rent out the treehouse in their backyard. (Seriously.) If you have space in a popular area, then you can easily create your own hotel of sorts.
It shows your true ignorance by calling someone an idiot. In no way was this thread used to alienate anyone, but merely having a heated discussion of professions and their importance. If you didn’t read my comment correctly, I said…”for example.” I know the difference between graphic design and being a surgeon. Those of you who are obviously majorly left-brained will never understand the creative industry. You’re right, anyone can be a bad designer, or a bad surgeon, or a bad accountant coordinator…etc. That’s why there exists terrible brand identities, malpractice suits, etc as well. All I was saying that the creative industry shouldn’t be held below the threshold of what is real and what is a fake profession. All professions should be respected in their own right. Period.
Uploading videos on YouTube - You can monetize your funny videos on YouTube with Google AdSense. All you need is a YouTube channel then upload videos of your funny cat or your crazy friend, and YouTube viewers will get you paid. Getting paid to download apps. You can get paid by specific companies by downloading their apps and getting bonuses for every week the app remains installed.
I really like the idea of writing poorly written ads. It seem like it can be easy and you can make a small profit. I know that use to work at a school and we got our extra money from writing grants. People can write grants to start a business so I am in the process of trying to write my own grant to start a community program for teens. its a litte extra money and I still get to do what I love. If you have any kind of hobby you can prob. turn that into some income if you can get creative. Good luck
Websites like Survey Junkie will pay you a decent chunk of change for the low-maintenance, borderline mindless task of completing surveys. Companies want to understand consumers better, and one way they do that is by compensating survey-takers. Most surveys pay between $0.50 and $1.25, and many of them take less than 5 minutes to do. You can read our full Survey Junkie review for more info.
×